Hugo Wolf: Auf ein Christblume II (To a Christmas Rose)

22 12 2009

Christ rose

Hellebores (Christmas roses), by alphageek, used under Creative Commons

Hugo Wolf’s primary vehicle of musical expression was the art song, primarily because it allowed him great expressive freedom in a miniature form. He was never successful in the larger forms, such as symphonic works or opera, perhaps because he lacked the stamina to stay dedicated to them. He wrote in furious spurts of inspiration that lasted about a year, then wrote nothing for months or years. Today, I think Wolf would be classified as manic-depressive.

In my opinion, some of Wolf’s most evocative songs are the among the 53 settings of poems by Eduard Mörike. It’s easy to see why — the deep, reflective, quasi-spiritual nature of Mörike’s poetry must have appealed to Wolf’s troubled mind. Several of the songs (Auf ein altes Bild, Auf ein Christblume II, Schlafendes Jesuskind) are Christmas-themed; they are tender, but still have the chromaticism and pangs of raw emotion that are so typical of Wolf. Auf ein Christblume II takes up the theme of the flower sleeping beneath the snow, a familiar image at this time of year.

A shoutout to the folks at YourAccompanist.com — I am grateful to be featured on their site this month, largely in part due to this blog. They have several of Wolf’s song accompaniments available for purchase.

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Sparks and Wiry Cries podcast

8 12 2009

by earsaregood under CreativeCommons

I received a comment from Martha Guth, a singer who hosts the “Sparks and Wiry Cries” art song podcast. I just finished listening to the most recent episode, and was particularly moved by the discussion and performance of Brahms’s second viola song, Die ihr schwebet, which begins with the tune of “Joseph Dearest, Joseph Mine” (or “Josef lieber, Josef mein” for the German purists).

Please jump over and support the Sparks and Wiry Cries podcast!